Ripples from the Rapids Archive




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Ripples from the Rapids - February 13, 2012

ROTARY CLUB OF CEDAR RAPIDS

RIPPLES FROM THE RAPIDS


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012

Editor: Larry H. Christy * Telephone: (319) 363-6301 * E-Mail: crrotary@mchsi.com * Web Site: www.rotaryclubofcedarrapids.org * District 5970 * Club 2185 * Chartered June 1, 1914

 

ripples this week  

 Dr. Trace Pickering - 21st Century Schools - Creating the Future of Learning for Iowa.  New Member Introduced, Club Begins to Prepare for 100th Anniversary, OPT OUT Foundation Campaign and Weekly Meeting Statistics.

 

ROTARY IMPACTS LIVES

DISTRICT CONFERENCE

SAVE THE DATE:

APRIL 27-28, 2012

FORT DODGE, IOWA


 

THE FRONT PAGE 

 

DR. TRACE PICKERING, DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY BUILDING, SOURCEMEDIA GROUP

21ST CENTURY SCHOOLS - CREATING THE FUTURE OF LEARNING FOR IOWA

 

Dr. Trace Pickering began by describing Agrarian America between 1600 and the late 1800’s.   America was composed of gentleman farmers, skilled craftsmen “Learned” leaders, a mass of undereducated populace and a new governmental form called democracy.  America wanted and needed a way to ensure our democracy, opportunities for the poor, a small class of educated leaders and masses of people with artisan and trades skills.

Founding Father Thomas Jefferson articulated his vision for American education (and for the State of Virginia): “To rake the genius from the rubbish.”  Jefferson wanted American education to give poor kids opportunities to go to school and ensure America had intellectuals to advance the republic.  He wanted to identify the top 10 students in Virginia every year.  That was what he wanted the system to do – rake the genius from the rubbish.

To accomplish this end we created one-room schoolhouses with children of all ages attending and children would “be raked” from the “rubbish” and the “rubbish” would return to work.  We taught basic reading, writing and computation and teachers were paid and housed by the community.  Until the mid 1800’s attendance was not required - it was the parent’s choice.

An agrarian, upstart nation forging a new democracy and settling a vast country, created an educational system to help America identify the best and brightest while proving a voluntary, basic education for the masses.  This design was well suited to the economic, political, social and educational needs and sensibilities of the time.

The industrial America emerged from 1890 to 1980.  It was a world of rapid industrialization, mass immigration and migration to the cities, a new type of job (working for a wage) and a huge disruption in how people lived and worked.  America wanted and needed to “Americanize” immigrants, deal with large numbers of children in the cities, prepare most of them to become factory workers and prepare a few to own and manage factories.

Jefferson’s vision “To rake the genius from the rubbish” still held, but in a new context.  Industrial America wanted education to efficiently and effectively sort out the “smart” kids from the “not so smart” kids, prepare the masses for the monotonous, repetitive work they faced in the factories, provide basic reading, writing and math to the masses so they could participate in society and create a workforce buffer.

Industrial American schools were designed around the factory model of efficiency and standardization.  They “batched” kids by age and treated them as products.  They simplified and standardized the work of teaching and learning.  They created tight, unwavering cycle times that would determine who could keep up and who was “defective.”  They instituted tests and exams to inspect the quality at the end and to “sort out” the “bright” from the “dull.”  This model assumed that intellect was “set” at birth and it was the job of the school to figure out who was smart.  Failure was assessed to the child – not the system.

In Industrial America we taught basic reading, writing and computation and most students got to the 8th grade level of education.  We developed curriculums to ensure everyone was exposed to the same material at the same time.  We focused on content knowledge.  We instituted strict behavior, discipline and attendance policies.  We “graded” the “products” (children) like we did commodities (poultry, etc).  We applied aptitude and intelligence tests to more efficiently sort and select the children.

An industrialized, bustling and growing superpower, America created an educational system to fill the factories, employ millions and do so efficiently and with high standardization using the best mechanical systems thinking of the day.  The design was well suited to the needs and sensibilities of the time.

Post-Industrial America (1980 – Present) is a period of rapid globalization, mass immigration, technological explosion creating a highly connected/networked society, new jobs (work shifting to jobs requiring more mind than body and a huge disruption in how people are living and working.  America needs to stay competitive in a post-industrial world, prepare large numbers of children to become knowledge, high-technology workers, prepare large numbers of entrepreneurs and innovators and to solve the economic disparities plaguing the country.

Thomas Jefferson’s vision is no longer valid.  The vision now demands that all of our children learn and develop to a high degree.  The new vision for post industrial America to help all children to learn to the highest levels possible, prepare all for the highly contextualized and intellectually demanding world they face, go beyond the old “basics” to ensure that children are lifelong learners and knowledge seekers and to provide avenues for the disadvantaged to realize the “American Dream”.

Schools need to be designed around the learner.  We need to organize children by what they know and can do, integrate subjects to help students understand the inter-relationships, create fluid, flexible structures allowing students to move through the system at the pace best suited for them.  The schools can’t do this alone.  We need to engage the larger community in connecting and learning with children.  We need to allow children’s passions and interest to help drive their learning.  We need teams of teachers who consistently interact with one another and students to create and plan.

We need individualized learning plans for each child based on emerging competencies and skills.  We need assessments to determine what a child needs and if they have achieved the learning level to move on.  We need to allow student passion and interest to drive learning and move teaching from “delivering content” to “providing deep learning at the point the child is ready and open to it.” 

 

  MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2012

THE SCOTTISH RITE TEMPLE

JOHN LOHMAN, PUBLISHER, THE CORRIDOR BUSINESS JOURNAL

REGIONAL BRANDING

We ask that you be through the foodline and seated no later than 12:15 P.M.

 

UPCOMING RCOFCR PROGRAMS & EVENTS

February 27, 2012 - Debi Durham, Director of the Iowa Economic Development Authority - Competing in a Global Economy.
March 5, 2012 - Aaron Putze - Governor Branstad's Iowa Food and Family Project.
March 12. 2012 - Dr. Bill Jacobson - "What is a Mason"?
March 19, 2012 - Karl Cassell, Cedar Rapids Civil Rights Commission.
March 26, 2012 - Vanessa Rogers, Cedar Rapids Metro Economic Alliance - 2012 Strategic Priorities for Downtwon Cedar Rapids & Downtown Parking Report.

 

 

 

CLUB NEWS

 

 

 

WELCOME NEW MEMBER!

 

WENDY BEATTIE

 

CLUB NAME: WENDY


General Manager
To The Rescue
3725 Center Point Road NE
Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52402

Telephone: 319-538-4287
Fax: 866-397-3834
E-mail:
wbeattie@totherescue.net
Sponsor: Barbara Green

 

Wendy is from an Air Force family.  She has lived in 32 states and 7 countries.  She attended grade school at Freedom 7 Elementary School next to Cape Canaveral and saw the Apollo missions launched.  At 14 she moved to South Africa where she finished school and then attended the University of Cape Town in South Africa.  She finished her last two years at Cal Tech and then went to work for Nordstrom's in San Francisco.  She came to Iowa to oversee the construction of the Nordstrom Fulfillment Center.


Wendy started a local branch of To The Rescue.  In about two years, To The Rescue grew from a skeleton staff to 44 employees.  To The Rescue is a business that helps people who are disabled, or temporarily unable, with services that include in-home care, yard and landscaping, handyman duties, cleaning for residential and commercial properties, staff support, energy efficiency, transportation and many other services. 


Wendy has been active in the Boy Scouts when her son, Ryan, was younger.  She is involved in Big Brothers Big Sisters, and is a Rough Rider sponsor, and once had a Rough Rider living at her home for a year.


Residence:
434 Bezdek Drive NW
Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52405
Telephone: 319-538-4287


 

 

 

 

 

CENTENNIAL PLANNING HAS BEGUN

 

DOWNTOWN ROTARY WILL BE 100 YEARS OLD IN APRIL 2014

 

Club President Ted Townsend has asked Former President Doug Laird to form a committee to consider plans for a celebration of the club’s 100th Anniversary in April 2014.  Twelve Former club presidents gathered in the Library at the Scottish Rite Temple this past Monday to discuss multiple possibilities and their recommendations will be considered by the Rotary board at their March meeting.

 

Cedar Rapids Rotary doesn't have exhaustive history files, but here is a bit of history relating to our founding 100 years ago.  It is adapted from information first put together my Marion H. "Bishop" Morrison, an early Ripples Editor and past president of the club.  Morrison joined our club in 1926.  He was a graduate of Drake University, spent four years  working for daily newspapers in Sioux City and Des Moines and 40 years with Northwestern Bell Telephone Company.  He was a Director of the Chamber of Commerce, President of the Old Washington High School P.T.A. and Chairman of the Community Chest.  His sons, M. Holbrook "Hobby" Morrison and Bernard "Barney" Morrison were also members of our club. 

 

ROTARY COMES TO CEDAR RAPIDS

 

Rotary was only nine years old when it came to Cedar Rapids in April, 1914.  In February, 1905, Paul Harris called together his little group of lonely Chicagoans to found what became the first service club in the world.  In 1908, San Francisco became Club No. 2, and the next year clubs were organized in Oakland, Seattle, Los Angeles, New York and Boston.  Rotary became international when the Winnipeg club was formed in 1910.  Two years later the Rotary census grew to fifty clubs, including one in England and one in Ireland.


Phoenix became Club No. 100 in 1914 and Cedar Rapids No. 118.  Clubs had been previously established in the then three largest cities in Iowa - Des Moines, Davenport and Sioux City.


One wonders if Paul Harris had any idea that within a half -century Rotary would spread to every country in what was then the free world.


CEDAR RAPIDS & THE WORLD IN 1914


In 1914, Cedar Rapids was a city of 40,000 people.  Louis Roth was mayor and George W. Clarke, who fathered the plan for the extension of the state capitol grounds, was governor of the state.  Charles D. Huston served the city as postmaster, and J. J. McConnell was superintendent of schools.  Miss Abbie S. Abbott ruled Old Washington High School with a firm but fair hand.  Luther Brewer, who was this club's second president, was president of the library board and Miss E. Joanna Hagey was librarian.  Among the prominent ministers of the city were Dr. E. R. Burkhalter at First Presbyterian, Dr. E. J. Lockwood at St. Paul's Methodist and Father J. J. Toomey at Immaculate Conception.


Prime hogs were selling at $8.75 per hundredweight, butter $.25 a pound, and eggs $.15 per dozen.  The Jones-Luberger-Pratt furniture store advertised nine-by-twelve Wilton carpet for $40.  Armstrong-McClenahan was getting $3.75 to $15 for suits for boys 6 to 18 years old.


It was a troubled world that year.  The Mexican bandit Pancho Villa was embarrassing the United States on the Rio Grande and only three months after the fledgling Rotary Club was formed here, the murder of the Austrian Grand Duke turned the world upside down, never to be the same again.


But the year saw some beneficial projects for the city.  Two organizations of enduring influence came into being in Cedar Rapids – Rotary and United Charities, forerunner of the Community Chest and the present-day United Way.


Cedar Rapids was emerging.  The interurbans to Iowa City and to Mt. Vernon were completed that year.  The Magnus Hotel was built and St. Paul's Methodist Church moved from Fifth Street and Fourth Avenue to its new building "clear out in the country" at Fourteenth Street and Third Avenue.  Another present-day church was dedicated - Immaculate Conception at Tenth Street and Third Avenue.


THE CLUB IS CHARTERED


William C. Henning, charter member, President of Cedar Rapids Business College for over 50 years, who died in 1972 at age 100, remembered that some preliminary work toward the organization of the club had been started the latter part of 1913.  Correspondence had been carried on with the three other Iowa clubs already in action.  Newspapers of the day stated that several informal meetings of the men, who were to become charter members, had been held previous to the charter meeting.  C. E. Taylor, manager of the Montrose Hotel, gave a dinner for members on March 27.  Dr. John A. Marquis, president of Coe College, presided and final plans for the first official meeting of the new club were made.


Mr. Henning also agreed with statements in the daily newspaper which credit John B. Gordon, Jr. with being the chief motivating force in the formation of the club.  He was the western representative of the Columbia Bank Note Company, and was affectionately known to his associates as Jack.  He left the city about 1917.  Luther A. Brewer, president of the Republican Printing Company, was another prime mover.  He was the second president of the club.


There is some haziness about the actual number of charter members.  One newspaper reported 18 and another 23.  Yet, the original treasurer's books to which we have had access show 48 members as having paid their initiation fees and dues as of April 6, 1914, the day the first official meeting was held.  It seems reasonable that these should be considered charter members.  On page 12 of the Cedar Rapids Gazette of April 6, 1914, is the following story of the birth of the club:


"With the presence of several prominent Rotarians from Des Moines, Davenport and other cities, officers of the Cedar Rapids Rotary Club were formally installed this afternoon during a luncheon at the Montrose Hotel.  The meeting really marked the birth of the organization here, although a temporary club had been holding meetings for several weeks.
    
“Officers are: Fred Fisher, President, Luther Brewer, Vice President, Tom Prowell, Secretary and Ed Wilcox, Treasurer.  Directors are: Ed Killian, Frank Whelihan, Elmer Allen and Joe McCormick.”  The Times also listed Dr. Richard Lord as a director.


"Before the installation, Allie Reed presided and the constitution and by-laws were formally adopted.  The meeting was then turned over to President Fisher.


Among those present from out of town, who spoke and told of the advantages to be gained by such a club, were Henry Moulton and Clifford DePuy of Des Moines, Allen Dawson and Oswald Becker of Davenport and W. J. Turck of Los Angeles (friend and guest of Will C. Henning).  Mr. Becker was president of the Davenport club and Mr. DePuy was president of the Des Moines Rotary Club.  All the visitors were enthusiastic in the apparent display of interest here, and predicted that the Cedar Rapids club had started out on the right track.  Several of the local members made addresses."


As Marion H. “Bishop” Morrison prepared the original text of this history he stated that "Yesterday morning (Palm Sunday) members of the local club attended services in the Liberal Christian Church (now the Peoples Church) and heard a splendid sermon by Rev. Joseph Fort Newton, who is a member of the club.  Miss Ruth Orchard sang 'The Palms' during the service.


During the luncheon, excellent music was rendered by the Imperial quartet, Messrs. Bruce and Allen Metcalf, James Cowden and Dr. F. E. Miller (a member of the club) with Dr. F. W. Rugh at the piano.  The Rotarians showed their appreciation by loud applause."


50 YEARS LATER


The club held its golden anniversary celebration April 16, 1964 with several hundred present including the Ladies of Rotary.  President Joe Daggett presided and the invocation was given by Rotarian Dr. Joseph E. McCabe, President of Coe College.  James C. Marvin, who was president in 1962-63 served as toastmaster. 


All past presidents who were present, including a number from out of the city, were presented and Rev. William A. Jacobs, pastor of the New England Congregational Church, Aurora, Illinois responded for them. 


The district Governor-elect, John H. McBurney of Webster City, spoke briefly and Will C. Henning, charter member, was introduced.  The address of the evening was given by the noted columnist and author, Cleveland Armory.  Adding to the pleasure of the evening were favors which were donated by the matched district of the year, in Central America.

 


 

ROTARY FOUNDATION DRIVE (2011-2012)

 

This year the board of directors again adopted The Rotary International goal that every Rotarian participate in supporting the good works of Rotary International by making a gift to the Rotary Foundation (a 501(c)(3) charity) at the $100 level and the board approved a contribution of $100 per member to be assessed on the January billing.  All contributions are eligible for Paul Harris Fellowship Credit.

The board made clear that they did not want the contribution to be mandatory.  All members are allowed to “opt out” of the $100 recommended donation assessment, either by pledging to give at a higher level, at a lower level, or (if they wish) to opt out of participation entirely.  Your decision in this regard has been handled discreetly and only the club Secretary knows the detail of who chose to contribute or not contribute. There is no penalty for opting to participate at a lower level or opting out of the campaign entirely.


Members who so desire can “opt out” of the Annual Rotary Foundation Assessment.  Do not include payment when you remit your club dues and charitable assessment to the club.  Club dues ($147.50) and the club charitable assessment ($50) are mandatory and payable by January 31, 2012.  


That said, Rotary International is essentially about working together to help the least fortunate members of humanity and we want to support The Rotary Foundation to the extent our members find suitable.  The club’s objective, as is that of The Rotary Foundation, remains $100 from every member every year and 100% participation in the work of Rotary. 
 
On behalf of the club's board, thank you for all of your contributions to Rotary and to our community and our world,

  
 

  ODDS & ENDS    


 

 


THE 4,637th MEETING OF THE ROTARY CLUB OF CEDAR RAPIDS 02/13/12

Presiding: President Ted Townsend.  Secretary/Treasurer: Larry Christy.  Sergeant-at-Arms: Nick Gearhart.   Attendance: Denny Wangeman.  Badges: Steve Heyer.  Greeters: Christine Crosby and Dick Heft.  Invocation: Steve Knutson.  Guests and Visiting Rotarians: Steve Kleiman.   February Program Chaiar: Chuck Peters.  Speaker’s Gift: Big Brothers/Big Sisters.  Cell Phones: Bill Gardam:  Eyeglasses: Chris Crosby, Jared Hills and Ralph Russell.

ATTENDANCE REPORT
TOTAL MEMBER COUNT 356 (36 HONORARY)
NUMBER USED FOR ATTENDANCE – 252 (EXCLUDES 104 HONORARY & EXEMPT MEMBERS)
MEMBERS PRESENT – 145 (0 HONORARY AND 18 EXEMPT)
GUESTS PRESENT - 7
MAKE UPS APPLIED TO THIS MEETING – 10
PERCENTAGE FOR THIS MEETING – 54.37%
PERCENTAGE FOR FEBRUARY 2012 (2 MEETINGS) –  60.52%
PERCENTAGE FOR ROTARY YEAR 2011-2012 (29 MEETINGS) – 53.24%
PERCENTAGE FOR ROTARY YEAR 2010-2011 – 57.38%
PERCENTAGE FOR ROTARY YEAR 2009-2010 – 61.59%
PERCENTAGE FOR ROTARY YEAR 2008-2009 – 59.63%
PERCENTAGE FOR ROTARY YEAR 2007-2008 – 60.72%
PERCENTAGE FOR ROTARY YEAR 2006-2007 – 65.64%
PERCENTAGE FOR ROTARY YEAR 2005-2006 –65.04%
PERCENTAGE FOR ROTARY YEAR 2004-2005 – 64.96%
PERCENTAGE FOR ROTARY YEAR 2003-2004 – 67.56%

MAKE UPS LOCAL 
CEDAR RAPIDS METRO NORTH, 01/05/12: Paul Brundell. CEDAR RAPIDS DAYBREAK, 01/06//12: No Report Received to Date.  CEDAR RAPIDS METRO NORTH, 01/12/12: None. CEDAR RAPIDS DAYBREAK, 01/13//12: No Report Received to Date.  CEDAR RAPIDS METRO NORTH, 01/19/12: Lois Buntz, Paul Brundell and Kelly Hauer and CEDAR RAPIDS DAYBREAK, 01/20//12: No Report Received to Date.  CEDAR RAPIDS WEST, 01/25/12: George Brunsheen and Larry Kudej.   CEDAR RAPIDS WEST, 02/01/12: Dee Baird, Dwight Hughes and Susan McDermott.  CEDAR RAPIDS SUNRISE, 02/02/12: No Report Received to Date. CEDAR RAPIDS METRO NORTH, 02/02/12: Dawn Svenson Holland. CEDAR RAPIDS DAYBREAK, 02/03//12: No Report Received to Date.  MARION/EAST CEDAR RAPIDS, 02/07/12:  CEDAR RAPIDS WEST, 02/08/12: Jeff Frese, Dwight Hughes, Kim Johnson and Larry Kudej.  CEDAR RAPIDS SUNRISE, 02/09/12: No Report Received to Date. CEDAR RAPIDS METRO NORTH, 01/09/12: None. CEDAR RAPIDS DAYBREAK, 02/10//12: No Report Received to Date.

MAKE UPS – OUT OF TOWN
None.

MAKE UPS – ECLUB ONE & WASHINGTON INTERACT
Sue Olson and Mark Hanson.

ROTARIAN GUESTS
None.

GUESTS OF MEMBERS
John Armon (Igam), Kathy Tervkina, and Tim McDougall (Peters), Kelly Pospisil and Paatrick Williams (Green) and Rhonda Andrews (Bergen).

 



 
THE BACK PAGE

 

BOARD NEWS

The January 26, 2012 meeting of the Board of Directors of the Rotary Club of Cedar Rapids was held at 7:30 A.M. in the Board Room of St. Luke’s Hospital with President-Elect Lois Buntz presiding.  Directors present were President-Elect Buntz, Chris Blake, Bob Carlson, Dick Heft, Salma Igram, Doug Laird, Elizabeth Schott, John Wasta and Allen Witt and Secretary Larry Christy.  Directors Arvind Dandekar, John Lohman and Ted Townsend were absent.  The board:

 Approved the minutes of the November 17, 2011 meeting of the board as circulated.  There was no December 2011 meeting of the board.
 Reviewed and acted upon club correspondence, requests for leaves of absence and other miscellaneous issues.
 Received the report of the Membership & Classification Committee and approved five new members recommended by the committee.  Reviewed results of the “Get Connected” campaign.
 Approved Exempt from Attendance Requirement Status under Rotary Rules for Gary Hinzman, Dennis McMinimen, James Nikrant, Mary Quass and William Vernon.
 Accepted, with regret , the resignations of Matt Brandes, Ron Fielder, Joe Hladky, Liz Hoskins, Jim Kern, Mark Long, Jim Nemmers, Doug Neumann and Len Strand from Active membership and Tom Podzimek and Chuck Wienecke from Honorary – Public Official membership.
 The Martin Luther King Luncheon sponsored with the United Way of East Central Iowa was reviewed and acknowledged as a success.  The luncheon this year was held at Kirkwood’s Convention Center.
 Former President Doug Laird reported on plans for the club’s Centennial in 2014.
 A request for funding from Metro High School for the Student Achievement Fund was discussed and the secretary was directed to obtain additional information to clarify the request.
 It was suggested that requests for funding should be reviewed quarterly rather than annually.
 Reviewed the Financial Statements for the period ended December 31, 2012.
 Reviewed the Attendance Report for the period July 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011. 
 Reviewed the Membership Reconciliation Report for the period July 1, 2011 through January 26, 2012.
 The next meeting of the board is scheduled for February 23, 2012 at 7:30 A. M. at St. Luke’s Hospital.


ROTARY CLUB OF CEDAR RAPIDS

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS

JULY 1, 2011 TO JUNE 30, 2012

Presiden Theodore E. Townsend (369-7204)(townsete@crstlukes.com)
President-Elect Lois A. Buntz (398-5372)(lbuntz@uweci.org)
Past President Douglas D. Laird (247-5000) (dlaird@skogman.com)
Director Christopher R. L. Blake (368-6464)(cblake@mtmercy.edu)

Director Robert E. Carlson (366-6421)(carlson@cmetroymca.org)

Director Arvind J. Dandekar (294-6664)(ajdandekar@aol.com)

Director Richard L. Heft (365-0107)(rheft1@imonmail.com)

Director Elizabeth Hladky (368-8520)(
elizabeth.hladky@gazcomm.com)


Director Salma Igram (393-3600)(sigram@cedargraphicsinc.com)

Director John F. Lohman (887-2251)(johnl@corridorbiznews.com)

Director John L. Wasta (364-8148)(johnwasta@pioneerworkspace.com

Director Allen Witt (362-9548)(allen@halleng.com)

Secretary/Treasurer Larry H. Christy (363-6301) (crrotary@mchsi.com)
Sergeant-at-Arms Nicholas C. Gearhart (364-6567) (nickgearhart@hotmail.com)